Online marketing an independent documentary

This website is a very good example for students of independent filmmaking as a well-done example of online marketing and promotion.

http://www.theentertainersmovie.com/

I would like to know more about the ragtime style of piano-playing after seeing the various clips.  I love what the left hand is doing with those amazing bass lines.

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The Real Glory

One of the few films about the Moro wars in Mindanao at the turn of the 20th century.  Sure, it’s dated and highly romanticized (1939), and it’s time for a real film about the subject, but it helps me right now and watching any of Gary Cooper’s performances is worth a view..

Original music for a student film

FYI
The Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program at the Seattle Film Institute is still accepting submissions of student made films for free original scores.
We are looking for student made films of any genre or length to provide original music to through the Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program.  This service, which includes a score recorded by professional musicians in a world class recording studio, is offered for free to student filmmakers.  It is an opportunity for our Masters students to use the skills learned during our program and collaborate with directors to produce custom music for any style of film.  The music is licensed to the filmmakers free of charge for use within their films in any and all media and for any promotional use (trailers, etc.) in connection to those films.
WE DO NOT ACCEPT ANY PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTIONS.
The submitted films must have been made as part of an educational program.
To have your film considered for our next recording session we would need picture lock by Sunday May 20th.
To have your film considered for our last recording session we would need picture lock by Thursday June 7th.
For additional details about the Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program please visit our website at: http://www.pnwfilmmusic.com
To fill out a film submission form, please go here:  https://www.sfi.edu/student-film-music-scoring-request-form

 

For any other questions feel free to contact me directly.
Thank you,

Sammy Applegate
Film Composer/PNWFS Program Assistant Director
Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program
Seattle Film Institute
3210 16th Ave W. 
Seattle, WA  98119
 
(800) 882-4734 // (206) 568-4387

The beginning of the story

This is a very useful video by Michael Arndt (Toy Story 3) about the struggle and importance of the story’s beginning–creating the foundation for the rest of the story.  I am very interested in the experience of writing and developing a story, asking myself, what does it feel like to write?  Writing is purely mechanical unless it is aligned with creative problem solving and lateral thinking.  Fun!

On the journey to writing a screenplay

These days I am fully committed to researching and writing a screenplay about desertion and rebellion and everything amok during the Philippine-American War, during the general time frame of 1898-1910, although the end date could allude to what follows in  the 1920s, 30s and beyond.  I have found some wonderful characters in a deeply reticulated chain of conflicted situations, and I feel passionate about the project.   In writing this screenplay I am pondering many difficult and unknown areas of thinking (for myself) about story structure, anti-hero characters, forgiveness, and complex interweaving of story lines.  I came across Billy Wilder’s ten rules–in my plebian words, “make them pay attention and make them care.” Here are Billy Wilder’s ten rules — old fashioned but mighty fine.

  1. The audience is fickle.
  2. Grab ’em by the throat and never let ’em go.
  3. Develop a clean line of action for your leading character.
  4. Know where you’re going.
  5. The more subtle and elegant you are in hiding your plot points, the better you are as a writer.
  6. If you have a problem with the third act, the real problem is in the first act.
  7. A tip from Lubitsch: Let the audience add up two plus two. They’ll love you forever.
  8. In doing voice-overs, be careful not to describe what the audience already sees. Add to what they’re seeing.
  9. The event that occurs at the second act curtain triggers the end of the movie.
  10. The third act must build, build, build in tempo and action until the last event, and then—that’s it. Don’t hang around.
 It’s a deep journey but that’s the reward.